Mary Halvorson on Thumbscrew and more…

We recently asked guitarist Mary Halvorson a few questions about Thumbscrew and her own musical background and approach. Be sure to catch Mary with Thumbscrew this Friday September 12th at Joe’s Cafe!

How did Thumbscrew come to form? My understanding is you’ve been playing with Tomas for awhile now…

Mary Halvorson: Thumbscrew’s beginning was an accident of sorts. Tomas and I have been playing together for 10 years now, and one of the many bands we play in together is Taylor Ho Bynum’s Sextet. A few years ago, Michael Formanek was subbing in Taylor’s band for a performance in New York, and the three of us (Michael, Tomas and myself) really hit it off musically as a rhythm section. We immediately talked about doing more playing as a trio. When we got together a few months later, we each wrote a couple pieces of music specifically for the new trio, and Thumbscrew took shape pretty organically from there.

Could you maybe talk a little about the qualities of both Tomas’ and Michael’s playing?

MH: For me it’s a real pleasure to play with both Michael and Tomas. Michael has been one of my favorite bass players ever since I was in college and discovered his playing through Tim Berne’s Bloodcount. I am also a huge fan of Michael’s records as a leader and numerous other projects he’s a part of. Thumbscrew was my first real opportunity to work closely with him, and it’s been quite an amazing experience. Tomas and I have been collaborating since 2004, in many different projects, from Matana Roberts to Mike Reed to Taylor Ho Bynum. I have always felt a strong musical connection with Tomas and have taken a lot of inspiration from his performing, composing and musical thinking, particularly as a part of his quintet, The Hook Up. Over the years I have enjoyed developing a strong musical rapport with him, now taking a new form in Thumbscrew.

Your last visit to St. Louis saw you playing in Taylor Ho Bynum’s Sextet (an incredible and memorable show!). What I noticed in Taylor’s writing approach was how he allowed vast amounts of compositional space for each musician’s voice, or character, to come through – even when there are six of you playing together in really tight musical sequences there still is a feeling it can go in an opposite direction at any moment. Could you share any insights into the process that musician/composers like Taylor and Anthony Braxton use for composing in these larger groups? 

MH: Taylor has set up a really interesting musical system for his sextet. The latest piece of music he composed is basically a modular suite. There are six compositions, but the order in which the compositions happen is left partially open to the musicians in the band, through a road map format. Band members can cue certain pieces in at certain times, and together those pieces function as one long continuous piece. The same composition might happen twice in a set, or might not happen at all. It’s interesting because the pieces are open enough that they can take on a really different form each time. And it’s a fun challenge to try to shape the pieces differently, to improvise endings, beginnings, and transitions. There is always a strong element of the unexpected.

Anthony Braxton’s larger ensembles have a similar yet distinct type of freedom. In many of his bands, musicians can cue in other musicians and even bring in entirely new compositions, improvised sections or structured improvisations in the midst of another composition. Sometimes there are section leaders within a larger ensemble, and section leaders can cue smaller sub-groups. The compositions that are created, like Taylor’s, are dynamic, based on larger structural systems, and are never performed the same way twice.

In the works you write/lead in (i.e. Mary Halvorson Quintet), where do you start with the composition? From guitar? Or do the ideas begin in a more abstract and conceptual manner?

MH: Normally I start a composition simply by improvising on guitar, until I come up with some sort of a small fragment or an idea that I can use as a seed for a composition. Getting that initial idea can take a long time, but once I get it I write pretty quickly and improvisationally; I elaborate on the fragment or idea and keep adding to it and changing it until it starts to take shape. I rarely have an overarching structural idea beforehand, so the compositions might go in any direction and often wind up in an entirely different place than they started.

When listening to your playing, not only does the listener notice the complexities and phrasings of your playing, but also the tonal sound itself as a defining part of your music. Was there a process that lead you this particular sound and setup we hear in your guitar-work?

MH: I’ve always enjoyed the acoustic sound of a guitar; the imperfections of the wood, buzzes, attack of the pick, etc. For that reason, I was drawn to a big archtop guitar, because even if it’s amplified, you can still hear a lot of the natural sound of the instrument. As far as an amplified tone, I’ve never liked reverb, and I tend to go for a sound that is clean and warm, and emulates the natural sound of the instrument, as a starting point. From there, I sometimes like to add effects (delay, pitch bending, distortion, tremolo). But I’ve always thought of those effects as an ornamentation of sorts to a more natural, clean sound.

Have there been any notable shows or music you’ve caught recently that you’d like to share?

MH: This July I did a solo guitar tour opening up for Buzz Osborne of the Melvins, who was doing a solo acoustic tour to support his new album, This Machine Kills Artists. I’ve always loved the Melvins, and hearing Buzz in a solo context was mindblowing. With the simple, stripped-down format of acoustic guitar and vocals, he performed an extraordinarily powerful and uncompromising set without losing an ounce of the intensity and energy of a full band. I had the privilege of listening to it for seven nights straight and never once grew tired of it.

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Thumbscrew

Friday, September 12, 2014
concert 7:30 PM
doors 7:00PM
Joe’s Cafe
6014 Kingsbury Ave., 63122 (map)
(SW corner of Kingsbury and Des Peres)
  • Mary Halvorson — guitar
  • Michael Formanek — bass
  • Tomas Fujiwara — drums
Under the title Thumbscrew, three foremost voices of NYC’s new jazz scene have come together to explore the crossroads of improvisation and composition. Comprised of Mary Halvorson (guitar), Michael Formanek (bass), and Tomas Fujiwara (drums), Thumbscrew functions as a vehicle to navigate both the modal complexities of jazz composition as well as the challenges of collective spontaneity. Thumbscrew’s sound originates from the interconnecting bonds its members have forged, playing in many and various formats over the years, such as composer/cornetist Taylor Ho Bynum’s large groups as well as Anthony Braxton’s experimental/compositional ensembles. Their 2014 self-titled release on Cunieform Records was described as “exploring open, undulating grooves through a frequent tightening and loosening of their interplay along serpentine lines” by Dusted Magazine.Known for her unmistakable tone and approach to guitar playing, Mary Halvorson has been described by NPR Music as “A guitarist who sounds like no other, Halvorson can astound and confound, with craggy phrasing, strange pitch-bends and pedal effects galore”.

A definite inspiration for bassist Michael Formanek’s creativity and versatility would be the broad generational range of distinguished musicians with whom he has performed, from Stan Getz and Freddie Hubbard throughout the ‘70’s-‘80’s, to Tim Berne and Marty Ehrlich during the ‘90’s and beyond.

Drummer Tomas Fujiwara works with rhythm as a pliable substance, resulting in a versatility that allows him to be continually active in collaborations with many different emerging voices, such as Matana Roberts and Matt Mitchell.

Check out this interview with Mary Halvorson!

Buy tickets for Thumbscrew Trio

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2014/2015 Season Announcement

THUMBSCREW (trio)

Friday, September 12, 2014
concert 7:30 PM
doors 7:00PM
Joe’s Cafe
6014 Kingsbury Ave., 63122 (map)
(SW corner of Kingsbury and Des Peres)
  • Mary Halvorson — guitar
  • Michael Formanek — bass
  • Tomas Fujiwara — drums
Under the title Thumbscrew, three foremost voices of NYC’s new jazz scene have come together to explore the crossroads of improvisation and composition. Comprised of Mary Halvorson (guitar), Michael Formanek (bass), and Tomas Fujiwara (drums), Thumbscrew functions as a vehicle to navigate both the modal complexities of jazz composition as well as the challenges of collective spontaneity. Thumbscrew’ssound originates from the interconnecting bonds its members have forged, playing in many and various formats over the years, such as composer/cornetist Taylor Ho Bynum’s large groups as well as Anthony Braxton’s experimental/compositional ensembles. Their 2014 self-titled release on Cunieform Records was described as “exploring open, undulating grooves through a frequent tightening and loosening of their interplay along serpentine lines” by Dusted Magazine.Known for her unmistakable tone and approach to guitar playing, Mary Halvorson has been described by NPR Music as “A guitarist who sounds like no other, Halvorson can astound and confound, with craggy phrasing, strange pitch-bends and pedal effects galore”.

A definite inspiration for bassist Michael Formanek’s creativity and versatility would be the broad generational range of distinguished musicians with whom he has performed, from Stan Getz and Freddie Hubbard throughout the ‘70’s-‘80’s, to Tim Berne and Marty Ehrlich during the ‘90’s and beyond.

Drummer Tomas Fujiwara works with rhythm as a pliable substance, resulting in a versatility that allows him to be continually active in collaborations with many different emerging voices, such as Matana Roberts and Matt Mitchell.


 

ELI KESLZER / RASHAD BECKER (solo performances)

Saturday, November 8, 2014
concert 7:30 PM, doors 7:00PM
The Luminary
2701 Cherokee St. 63118 (map)
  • Eli Keszler — drums
  • Rashad Becker — electronics
NYC based drummer and sound artist, Eli Keszler, engages in a frictional push-and-pull of percussive sound through instrumental means which are both traditional and experimental. His oeuvre is multi-faceted, consisting of musical scores informed by his print making/drawing practices as well as his construction of resonating piano wire installations (most recently an installation on the Manhattan Bridge commissioned by NPR Radio). His hyper-percussive improvisations are ripe with detailed and pointillistic attacks that build momentum to form frenzied sonic clusters, drawing inspiration from the spontaneity of Han Bennik’s percussion work as well as the harmonic density of Colin Nancorrow’s compositions. With full length albums on the vinyl-art label PAN and the legendary avant-garde jazz label ESP-Disk, Keszler’s releases have received “album of the year” awards from the Boston Globe and Wire Magazine. After studying composition with Anthony Coleman and Ran Blake, Eli Keslzer toured extensively, performing both solo as well as in collaboration with such diverse artists as Christian Wolff, Phill Niblock, Tony Conrad, Joe McPhee, Jandek, Roscoe Mitchell and Keith Fullerton Whitman.Berlin electronic musician, Rashad Becker, utilizes real-time synthesis and sampling techniques that set into motion intricate sonic worlds that recall the complexities of human speech and various exotic aural phenomena, and warrant comparisons to the detailed sonics of pioneers like Tod Dockstader, and the GRM school of electronic music. Oscillating pitches conjoin, multiply and dissolve in unlikely configurations, creating a complex ecosystem of sound. Also, Becker’s work as a vinyl cutting and mastering engineer at Berlin’s Dubplates Mastering Studio (where he has overseen thousands of mastering jobs) has endowed him with a unique insider’s perspective on the practice and aesthetics of modern day electronic music and production.

After years of performing, Becker’s sole release came out on PAN in 2013, aptly titled Traditional Musics of Notional Species. Pitchfork described Becker’s LP as an album that “breathes in pointed, often hilarious detail. [Becker’s] sounds actually sound like things.”

*** SPECIAL WORKSHOPS/ARTIST TALKS TBA ***


 

ROSCOE MITCHELL and CRAIG TABORN (duo)

Friday, December 5th, 2014
concert 7:30 PM, doors 7:00PM
The Stage at KDHX
3524 Washington Ave. 63103 (map)
  • Roscoe Mitchell — saxophones
  • Craig Taborn — piano
An internationally renowned musician, composer and innovator, Roscoe Mitchell began his distinguished career in the spirited 1960s of Chicago. In Mitchell’s own opinion, his work is a product of his heritage in the fertile art communities of the AACM (Association for Advancement of Creative Musicians) and The Art Ensemble of Chicago. Both organizations spawned large networks of musicians and inspired radical approaches to performance and musical thought, thus informing his own practice for over five decades. Primarily known for his saxophone playing, Mitchell’s multi-instrumental palette also includes various flutes, woodwinds and a broad range of percussion.Mitchell’s monumental 1966 album, Sound, introduced new ways of freely improvising and composing and has long been cited as an essential building block of the “free-jazz” vernacular. Now at the age 73, Mitchell has recorded works on over 83 albums and has written over 250 compositions. Throughout his composed works Mitchell expresses ideas that embrace a broad span of musics from energetic free jazz to traditional music methodologies to complex compositions for chamber groups. Longstanding collaborations have continued with a coterie of diverse musicians: Muhal Richard Abrams, Anthony Braxton, Lester Bowie and Pauline Oliveros. Mitchell has been named Darius Milhaud Chair of Composition at Mills College in Oakland, California, where he currently lives and works.

NYC pianist and ECM recording artist, Craig Taborn, has remained a ubiquitous presence on the jazz scene for the past two decades, performing with young jazz musicians and seasoned veterans as well as experimental rock and techno artists. His pianistic approach alludes to the explorations of Bill Evans, Keith Jarrett, and Cecil Taylor and expands further upon these models through his alternate use of Spartan subtlety and dense, hypnotic chord structuring. With regard to his performance sensibilities, Taborn explains that this takes shape by “listening to the really subtle details of instrumental sound, because you don’t just have to rest on notes and rhythms. You can rest on overtones and undertones and other nuances of sound to draw from. When you listen to silence, it’s really rich with possibility, and we start from that place.” At any given time his ongoing band/collaboration-list is over twenty names, which now include Tim Berne, Lotte Anker, Gerald Cleaver, William Parker and Vijay Iyer.

*** SPECIAL WORKSHOPS/ARTIST TALKS TBA ***


 

JOHANNA BALLOU

Saturday January 17th, 2015
Concert 7:30PM
560 Music Center
560 Trinity Ave, 63130 (map)
  • Johanna Ballou — piano
  • David Ramos — Violin
  • Jeanine Garesche — Clarinet
  • Tracy Andreotti — Cello
Johanna Ballou is a young American pianist who has been enthralling American and European audiences with her magnetic stage presence and dynamic interpretations. She completed her studies at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama in the UK and has studied with Daniel Martyn Lewis, Rolf Hind, Seth Carlin, William Phemister, Vera Parkin, and members of Grammy Award-winning ensemble Eighth Blackbird. After her acclaimed Welsh premier of Gyorgy Ligeti’s Piano Concerto, she toured alongside members of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and London Sinfonietta for the contemporary chamber opera company Music Theatre Wales. She collaborated with Diversions, the National Dance Company of Wales, and worked in music for Welsh independent film, television, theater, and art installation projects. Since returning to the states in 2009, she has continued her performance career in both solo and collaborative piano. She works closely with composers in the performance of new music, and performs educational programs for children throughout Missouri and Illinois.Ballou’s January concert will include selections that employ a variety of modern classical approaches. The instrumentation will consist, in part, of: clarinet, violin and piano, and the repertoire for her program will include: Histoire du Soldat (Stravinsky), The Horse with the Lavender Eye (Stephen Hartke), Borrowed Chords (Christopher Stark), and Court Studies from the Tempest (Thomas Ades).

 

OKKYUNG LEE / LOTTE ANKER (solo sets and collaborative duo)

Saturday, February 21, 2015
Concert 7:30 PM
Doors 7:00 PM
Joe’s Cafe
6014 Kingsbury Ave., 63122 (map)
  • Okkyung Lee — cello
  • Lotte Anker — saxophones
Okkyung Lee has been developing her own approach to cello performance for over a decade. Unbound by any specific genre or style, her visceral yet communicative sound draws from her background in extended instrumental techniques, Korean traditional musics and contemporary “noise” aesthetics. Born in Korea but based in New York City since 2000, she has released several albums on labels such as Tzadik, Ideologic Organ, and Ecstatic Peace. A list of her musical partnerships is long and diverse and include such maverick sound-experimentalists as Christian Marclay, Thurston Moore, Laurie Anderson, Ikue Mori, Jim O’Rourke and C. Spencer Yeh, as well as master instrumentalists like John Zorn, Chris Corsano, Leo Wadada Smith, Vijay Iyer and John Edwards. Okkyung’s forays include collaborations with visual artists and choreographers to develop multi-disciplinary performances, many of these ultimately presented at Dance Theater Workshop, Issue Project Room and The Kitchen.In an unforgettable 2011 performance in St. Louis, Danish saxophonist, Lotte Anker, left a lasting impression on all those who witnessed and an eager anticipation for a return visit. Informed by the rich improvised music scene of Copenhagen during the late ‘80’s, Anker has honed a dramatic sense of pacing and tone, juxtaposing brisk sounds against long stretches of extended melody, creating an effect that is both moody and responsive…. and occasionally sounding as if Evan Parker were to sit in with Sun Ship-era Coltrane.

Anker has maintained her long-running engagement with the trio of Gerald Cleaver and Craig Taborn, as well as a trio with Ikue Mori and Sylvie Courvosier. Other regular collaborators include Fred Frith, Paal-Nilsen Love, and Fred Lonberg-Holm.


 

ON FILLMORE (Glenn Kotche, Darin Gray)

Saturday, March 14, 2015
Concert 7:30 PM
Doors 7:00 PM
The Stage at KDHX – welcomed by KDHX
3524 Washington Ave. 63103 (map)
  • Glenn Kotche — percussion
  • Darin Gray — bass
Once dubbed “the rhythm section’s revenge” by Jim O’Rourke, On Fillmore is the multi-instrumental duo of bassist Darin Gray (St. Louis) and percussionist Glenn Kotche (Chicago). Kotche and Gray first came in contact with one another at recording sessions in 1999 during which the On Fillmore project was conceptualized. Over a decade later the band is still stretching the very definition of the term “rhythm section” by their use of upright bass, exotic percussion, vibraphone, various small instruments and the superimposition of field recordings.Kotche and Gray both have long and impressive musical résumés. Well known for his tenure with Wilco, Kotche is a respected composer whose 2006 solo album, Mobile, was released on Nonesuch. Darin Gray’s output of recordings began in the ’90s, when he was a member of various experimental rock bands. Since then, Gray has been consistently active as a world class performer and improviser, releasing solo recordings as well as numerous collaborative works with musicians Loren Mazzacane Connors, Akira Sakata, Chris Corsano (as Chikamorachi), among many others. The past two years have seen Gray active in tours with NPR’s Radiolab series and Jeff Tweedy.

*** SPECIAL WORKSHOPS/ARTIST TALKS TBA ***


 

Tim Berne’s Snakeoil – (quartet)

Friday, May 8, 2015
Concert 7:30 PM
Doors 7:00 PM
The Stage at KDHX – welcomed by KDHX
3524 Washington Ave. 63103 (map)
  • Tim Berne — saxophone
  • Oscar Noriega — clarinets
  • Matt Mitchell — piano
  • Ches Smith — percussion
New York-based alto saxophonist Tim Berne has long been regarded as one of the Downtown scene’s most forward thinking bandleaders. Active in New York since 1974, Berne has fostered the creative talent of subsequent generations.Since learning music at the elbow of St. Louis master Julius Hemphill in the ’70s, Berne has built an expansive discography, and The New York Times described Berne’s signature sound as one consisting of “wide intervals, athletic tone, tiny grooves worked into the music’s pivots and hesitations”.

Within the project, Snakeoil, Berne writes highly investigative and intricate jazz, bringing together the talents of Oscar Noriega (clarinet, bass clarinet), Matt Mitchell (piano), and Ches Smith (drums, percussion). The group has released two highly acclaimed albums for ECM.

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New Music Circle Showcase

Ingrid Laubrock + Tom Rainey (duo)
Tyler Damon/Chris Trull/Kevin Harris (trio)
Nathan Cook (solo)

Tuesday, May 20, 2014
concert 7:00 PM, doors 6:30PM
William A Kerr Foundation
21 O’Fallon St (map)
St. Louis, MO 63102
NMC will host a special community outreach event on the evening prior to this showcase — Please see below for information.
This year’s annual NMC Showcase concert will see three separate sets by local, regional, and touring musicians. Performances include: touring duo Ingrid Laubrock and Tom Rainey, a collaborative trio of Tyler Damon/Kevin Harris/Chris Trull, and a solo performance by Nathan Cook.

Ingrid Laubrock / Tom Rainey (NYC)
German-born saxophonist Ingrid Laubrock and drummer Tom Rainey are perhaps two of New York City’s most active jazz improvisers and sought after collaborators. Both may be found on any given night performing with names such as Anthony Braxton, William Parker or Mary Halvorson.

Performing last year in a NMC concert featuring pianist Kris Davis, Laubrock/Rainey will make a return to STL amidst a United States tour. Given Tom Rainey’s voluminous recording credits and the artistic caliber of the musicians with whom he has performed (Tim Berne, Craig Taborn, among others), he could easily be placed on the A-list of drummers closely identified with the New York City modern creative jazz scene, from the late ’80s onward. Ingrid Laubrock’s saxophone phrasings swiftly range from pensive melodiousness to the tough muscularity of free-jazz. She is at once capable of recalling the fierce tones of Albert Ayler and the spontaneous tonal sequences of Eric Dolphy.

Tyler Damon / Chris Trull / Kevin Harris (Bloomington, IN/ St. Louis)

Drummer Tyler Damon (Bloomington, Indiana) will also make a return to St. Louis after playing a concert last summer at the St. Louis Art Museum in a power-house trio with Darin Gray and Mars Williams. Tyler has been described by Darin Gray as “the up-and-coming young drummer in the midwest, and a voice that will be active for years to come.” This showcase will see Damon pairing with guitarist Chris Trull and electronic musician Kevin Harris. As a member of local experimental-rock groups such as Yowie and Grand Ulena, Chris Trull’s razor sharp guitar intonations employ unique tunings and scalings with mathematical dexterity. Whether curating this years sound-installation series at CAM, building elaborate audio/visual systems, or performing in countless collaborations and solo performances, Kevin Harris has remained a gem of the the St. Louis experimental community.

Nathan Cook (St. Louis)

St. Louis sound-artist and label proprietor Nathan Cook will round out this event with a performance combining electronic, acoustic, and playback sounds. Since arriving in St. Louis in 2008, Cook has become one of St. Louis’s most prolific artists on the underground experimental scene, consistently performing and collaborating with other artists, composing sound installations (as featured currently at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis) and releasing two volumes to date on his Close-Far label of cassette compilations that exclusively feature local experimental acts.

Plus, Free Workshop!

NMC will host a special community outreach event on the evening prior to this showcase. Ingrid Laubrock and Tom Rainey will collaborate in two short improvised sets with a variety of St. Louis’s diverse music community, and partake in a Q+A session. Confirmed local names include Dave Stone (saxophone), Mabel Suen (guitar/saxophone), and Alex Cunningham (violin).
This event is free and takes place on Monday, May 19th from 7pm – 8:30pm at Blank Space (2847 Cherokee St. — map).

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International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) with Claire Chase

Friday, April 4th, 2014
concert 7:30 PM
doors 7:00 PM
The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts
3716 Washington Boulevard (map)
St. Louis, MO 63108
  • Claire Chase — flute
  • David Bowlin — violin
  • Kyle Armbrust — viola
  • Katinka Kleijn — cello
  • Randall Zigler — bass
The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), described by the New York Times as “one of the most accomplished and adventurous groups in new music,” is dedicated to reshaping the way music is created and experienced. ICE functions as performer, presenter, and educator, advancing the music of our time by developing innovative new works and new strategies for audience engagement. ICE redefines concert music as it brings together new work and new listeners in the 21st century. Since its founding in 2001, ICE has premiered over 500 compositions – the majority of these new works by emerging composers – in venues ranging from alternative spaces to concert halls around the world.

A 2012 MacArthur Fellow, Claire Chase is a soloist, collaborative artist, and arts entrepreneur. Over the past decade Chase has presented the world premieres of over 100 new works for flute, many of them tailor-made for her. In 2013 Chase released Density, for which The Washington Post praised her as “One of the most electrifying flutists on the planet.”

ICE presents a performance inspired by the current Pulitzer exhibition, Art of Its Own Making, which “explores the autonomous object as something simultaneously enduring and ephemeral, synchronic, and diachronic.” The performance will include the following works:

  • George Brecht, Flute Solo(1962)
  • Mario Diaz de Leon, Luciform (2012)
  • Nam June Paik, Dragging Suite
  • Ken Friedman, Explaining Fluxus(1986)
  • Ken Friedman, Cardmusic for Audience
  • Wolfgang Rihm, Verzeichnung-Studie, for viola, cello, and bass (1986)
  • Ben Vautier, Three Pieces for Audiences(1964)
  • Ben Vautier, Look (1964)
  • Emmett Williams, In Unison (1962)
  • Sofia Gubaidulina, String Trio, (1988)
  • Mieko Shiomi, Event of Midnight (1963)
  • Yoko Ono, Lighting Piece (1955)

Buy tickets for ICE International Contemporary Ensemble

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This event is made possible by The Phoebe Dent Weil Charitable Foundation

A Special artist talk and Q+A with Claire Chase will take place at the Regional Arts Commission (6128 Delmar Blvd. 63112) on Thursday, April 3rd, from 6:30pm-7:30pm.
This event is free and open to the public.

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