59th Season Kickoff at Tick Tock Tavern (8/22)

Help support New Music Circle’s upcoming 59th season by joining us for an evening of drinks and DJ’s on Tuesday, August 22nd (7:00pm – 9:30pm) at Tick Tock Tavern (3459 Magnolia Ave Saint Louis, MO 63118) located in Tower Grove East. RSVP here for updates.

A full announcement of our upcoming season concerts and events will soon be available. Please sign up on our mailing list for an upcoming email announcement.

FREE! – no admission cost or cover –

On August 22nd from 7pm-9:30pm DJ’s will play records and raffle prizes (including CD’s, LP’s, and tickets to upcoming NMC concerts). All proceeds of drinks purchased during these hours at Tick Tock Tavern will help support New Music Circle concerts and workshops throughout the coming year. Tick Tock Tavern is a cash-only bar with an ATM machine located on premises.

If you are unable to attend, and would like to make a donation to support our 59th season, please visit our donate page HERE, to make a tax-deductible donation.

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SUMMER BREAK! Upcoming Support Event + 59th Season Details….

Thank you to the incredible crowd who attended our May concert! You can find a detailed summary of this beautiful night at Sound Of STL’s review HERE.

We are currently on a summer break, however we will be announcing our upcoming season very soon (please stay tuned!) – and have a fundraising event coming up on June 13th (please see the details below).

STEINS FOR SUPPORT! 

Tuesday, June 13, 2017. 5pm – 8pm. FREE

Please help support New Music Circle and join us at  Urban Chestnut, Midtown location (3229 Washington Ave, St. Louis, MO 63103) on Tuesday June 13 from 5:00 to 8:00.  Hang out, drink beer and have fun.  A portion of beverage purchases will be donated to NMC and help us continue presenting concerts and workshops.

 

 

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Robert Beatty / Matchess / Hylidae / Nadir Smith + More…

Saturday, May 13, 2017 – William A Kerr Foundation (21 O’Fallon Street – map

Our annual NMC showcase will feature regional and local electronic musicians, DJ’s, and video artists.

Tickets are now available here

RSVP on Facebook here

 

 

Join us for a end of the season party
Saturday, May 13th, 2017
William A Kerr Foundation LLC (21 O’fallon Street)
Doors at 8pm. Concert begins at 9pm.

New Music Circle presents
Matchess (Chicago)
Robert Beatty/Three Legged Race (Lexington, KY)
Hylidae
Nadir Smith (aka Biggie Stardust)
Guest DJ’s: Crim Dolla Cray & The Freaker’s Ball w/ DJ Swan on KDHX
Guest visuals by: José Garza, Cole Lu, Chad Z Hickman, Blake Butler, and Jeremy Kannapell. More to be announced…


Matchess (Chicago, IL)
http://matchess.tumblr.com/

Matchess is the solo work of musician Whitney Johnson. The project considers the reproduction of sound and meaning through a range of historical material processes, including live tape looping, cassette sampling, and field recording. With the limited palette of a 1960s Ace Tone organ, viola, analog drum machine, stereo reel-to-reel, and voice, she crafts a sound collage of ephemeral songs on a surface of droning ambient noise. Matchess invokes music of the past, including musique concrète, komische, and early electronic experiments, while also referencing texts of the past, including symbolist poetry, science fiction metanarrative, and her own lyrical technique of the sigil mantra. In addition to her solo work, Matchess collaborates widely in Chicago with such artists as Circuit des Yeux, Gel Set, TALsounds, and many others.

Robert Beatty/Three Legged Race (Lexington, KY)
http://www.robertbeattyart.com/

The scope of Robert Beatty’s hydra-headed art practice has grown into an extreme articulation of unconfined creativity across multiple disciplines. A founding member of 2000′s noise outfit Hair Police, as well as visionary illustrator and album-art designer for many of this era’s most celebrated underground artists.

Robert Beatty performs his solo work (sometimes under the name Three Legged Race) favors an intentionally dematerialized approach, employing just a sequencer program in an iPhones, assorted pedals, and a lone tape machine. Acoustic instruments, (such as dulcimer and piano), are sampled elements which warp into un-recognizable dimensions.

In addition to his music and graphic art, however, Beatty has quietly created dozens of moving-image works: music videos (for groups such as On Fillmore) as well as in art installations (like an upcoming program at Anthology Film Archives in Manhattan). Where Beatty’s album designs call to mind the graphic and optical intensity of 1960s-70s psychedelic cover art, among many other influences, his video works reflect his devotion to a wide range of experimental cinema, in particular the films of Polish animation and pioneers of computer art.


Hylidae (STL)
https://hylidae.bandcamp.com/

Hylidae is the moniker of Jon Burkhart, a St. Louis native who records music which seeks the danceable intersection of pop and experimental music. Burkhart utilizes synths, samplers and sequencers in his current setup to produce psychedelic-tinged electronica. Since debuting his project in 2013, Hylidae has become an essential presence on the St. Louis underground music scene.

He occupies a lonely alleyway between the club and the avant-garde, offering little compromise while blending hyperactive beats with more pensive ambient works. His recent album, a self-titled release through Minneapolis-label Night-People Records/ Wet Hair, is proof positive of Burkhardt’s vision—an audible dance party at the end of the world.

Nadir Smith (aka Biggie Stardust) – (STL)
https://www.stlmag.com/arts/music/the-intuitive-soundscapes-of-biggie-stardust/

“When I think about [the music] too much, it just really doesn’t work out. I try to keep things as intuitive as possible. I see it as me building a riddle in a live setting,” says electronic sound artist Olan, short for Thomas Olanrewaju Osunsami, the figurehead behind Nadir Smith (formerly Biggie Stardust). He relates a stream of consciousness using two sample machines, calling on pieces pulled from lost or long-forgotten sources. Olan’s approach feels most akin to a journey—like soundtracking a film too alien for the human eye to see. He counts on brevity to break from the pack, with set times that run roughly half the length of his peers in the ambient genre. That respect for the audience’s time can be traced to Olan’s roots in the DIY scene of his hometown of Peoria, Illinois.

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