John Wiese (Solo Performance and Composition for St. Louis Ensemble)

John Wiese (STL Residency)
Saturday, November 11, 2017

advanced tickets here / RSVP on Facebook here for updates on residency and promotions
Xavier Hall University Theatre, Saint Louis University
3733 West Pine Mall, 63108
John Wiese – electronics & compositions for St. Louis ensemble

+ STL RESIDENCY: Workshops and Special Events throughout the week – TBA


John Wiese is an artist and composer living in Los Angeles, California. He is a native of St. Louis, where as a young teenager he began experiments with home-recording on a cassette 4-track. He has since solidified his name as a tremendously prolific performer and recording artist, with expertise in composition, texture, and sonic experimentation. Wiese says he doesn’t really think of himself as a musician in the traditional sense, and instead of writing purely notated music he works with manipulating, cutting and arranging sounds electronically. The end product is more like a meticulous collage, built upon dense, nuanced sounds ranging from the minimal to the frenetic.

With a lengthy résumé of solo releases, Wiese’s projects as a collaborator have increased over the last decade to produce works with the likes of veteran jazz-improviser, Evan Parker, rock bands like No Age and Wolf Eyes, and metal groups such as Sunn O))). Recently, he has lead collaborative projects for large groups, developing a method of “text-based scores”. For his St. Louis performance he will debut a site-specific composition that includes over 20 local musicians, utilizing both traditional and non-traditional instrumentation.

Co-presented in partnership with Department of Fine & Performing Arts, Saint Louis University
Special support provided has been provided Arts and Education Council

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Battle Trance

Saturday, Dec 2, 2017

The Luminary
2701 Cherokee St., 63118

Travis Laplante – saxophone
Patrick Breiner – saxophone
Matthew Nelson – saxophone
Jeremy Viner – saxophone


The all-tenor sax quartet, Battle Trance, specializes in the uncanny transformations of their instruments. Together they perform longform, meditative pieces with a strong emphasis on drone, circular breathing, and trancelike repetition, bringing to mind the works of 20th Century minimalist composers like Philip Glass or Steve Reich, but with an added primal energy and urgency reminiscent of Pharaoh Sanders or Joe McPhee.

Battle Trance has released two albums to date on the prolific indie-label, NNA Tapes: Palace of the Wind (2014) and Blade of Love (2016). Both albums have won praise for their genre-crossing compositions, drawing comparisons to the contemporary classical world, modal avant-garde jazz, and noise-based experimentalism. In live settings the quartet is capable of creating a hypnotic fury of notes, unifying both the harmonic and physical in sound.

presented in partnership with The Luminary

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ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble)

Saturday, January 13, 2018

Pulitzer Arts Foundation
3716 Washington Blvd, 63108

Claire Chase – flute
Tyshawn Sorey – drums, percussion, glockenpsiel , compositions
Corey Smythe – piano & compositions


Three years ago, NMC drew a standing-room-only crowd to the Pulitzer, to see Claire Chase, who The New York Times described as “one of the most electrifying flute players on the planet.” She now returns to St. Louis with multi-instrumentalist Tyshawn Sorey and pianist Corey Smythe, core members of the arts collaborative she founded, ICE, which The New Yorker described as “America’s foremost new music ensemble.”

Chase is a MacArthur Genius Grant recipient, and through ICE, has premiered more than 800 new music works around the world. Sorey, a composer, percussionist, trombonist, and pianist, has just released his sixth record, Verisimilitude, this August; The New York Times called it “his most captivating album yet,” praising the effortless way it obliterates the line between composition and improvisation. Smythe, who performed on the album, is known for his strong jazz improvisation skills, as well as his work in classical and new music. He can be heard on Hilary Hahn’s Grammy Award-winning In 27 Pieces and at the Mostly Mozart festival in Lincoln Center.

For this concert, the trio will perform an eclectic program: Pauline Oliveros’ Earth Ears and Environmental Dialogue, Morton Feldman’s 1978 work Why Patterns? and two new pieces: a Smythe/Sorey duet, and a Tyshawn Sorey composition for drums and contrabass flute.

Presented in partnership with Pulitzer Arts Foundation.

Special support for this event has been made possible by the Phoebe Dent Weil Charitable Trust.

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Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe

Saturday, February 24, 2018

Urb Arts
2600 N 14th St, 63106

Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe – modular synthesizer, electronics, voice, and video


Some artists find their voice and then spend their career perfecting it. There are others, however, who spend an entire lifetime in continual transition, as Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe has done. Beginning with his solo electronic work in the late-nineties, Lowe’s vernacular has continually evolved deeper into a world comprised of spontaneous electronic sound, droning modular synthesizer, and vocal improvisations.

Lowe was a vital part of the thriving Chicago underground for some thirteen years before eventually moving to his current home in Brooklyn, where he entered a new chapter of musical creativity. Enamored with the possibilities of electronics, he began exploring the pliable workings of modular synthesizers: “They’re interchangeable, and have the potential to be ever-transforming,” he enthuses. Upon listening to his recorded works, one encounters Lowe’s intuitive method of using analog modular systems to echo the organic nature of the human voice to produce subliminal, trance-like sounds.

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The Thing

Thursday, March 22. 2018

Off Broadway
3509 Lemp Ave., 63118

Mats Gustaffson – saxophones
Ingebrit Håker Flaten – upright and electric basses
Paal Nilssen-Love – drums


Swedish/Norwegian trio The Thing was formed to create a long awaited synthesis where garage rock and jazz styles could merge by means of this high energy vehicle. Though the group initially came together in 1999 as a tribute project dedicated to legendary composer/trumpeter Don Cherry, it quickly evolved and found its own identity, performing improvised music, informed by the urgency and simplicity of garage rock. If you line up a list of The Thing’s cover selections (songs by The Stooges, The Cramps, The Sonics, and PJ Harvey) beside their roster of collaborators (experimental-rock-luminaries like Jim O’Rourke, Joe McPhee, Peter Brötzmann, and Neneh Cherry) you can get an idea of where their sensibilities lie.

Boot! (2013) is The Thing’s sixth full-length album, and it is among the group’s finest efforts at pairing broad physicality with heady free jazz technique. The record opens with a high-volume reimagining of India, from John Coltrane’s 1963 album Impressions. Here, spiritual jazz is recast as raw and sludgy stoner rock, producing an album of genuine “fusion music” in the best sense of the word.

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