Two free artist talks by Charlemagne Palestine this Friday

Charlemagne Palestine will partake in two artist talks and Q&A’s on Friday, November 6th. These are both FREE and open to the public. Outside of his voluminous musical works and performances he also is a noted visual and performance artist (with works showing at MOMA and The Whitney). Throughout the 1970s, Palestine produced a seminal body of performance-driven, psychodramatic video works in which he activates a ritualistic use of physicality, motion and sound to achieve an outward articulation of internal states. He will discuss both his visual art and musical works at both of these talks.

Friday, November 6
10am – 11am
Kemp Auditorium (in Givens Hall). First floor. Room #116
(parking available on Skinker Blvd.)
Hosted and led by Heather Bennett (Sam Fox School Lecturer)
Facebook event page here

Friday, November 6
12pm – 1pm
Free and open to the public
Sverdrup Complex, 8300 Big Bend Boulevard, Room 123
(Street parking available on Big Bend or parking garage on Garden Ave.)
Hosted and led by Marie Heilich (curator, writer, and the Assistant Director of White Flag Projects)
Facebook event page here
Charlemagne_THE_FILM_GALLERY
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TWO concerts by Charlemagne Palestine this weekend

New Music Circle’s second presentation of our 57th season will take place next Saturday (11/7) and Sunday (11/8), and feature Charlemagne Palestine (Brussels/NYC). Palestine will perform two nights of concerts, each night utilizing different instrumentation. Night one (11/7) will involve piano, voice, electronics, and stuffed animals at The Pulitzer Arts Foundation. On Night two (11/8) he will make use of the Historic Trinity Lutheran’s wonderful church organ, where he will be joined with a live video accompaniment by STL video artists, Chad Eivins and Kevin Harris.

Here is a short clip of Charlemagne Palestine discussing his thoughts on playing cathedral organs and their microtonal capabilities, ” Everywhere you go in the church the sound changes. You turn your head and the sound changes…because it’s a three dimensional, fluid sonority in in constant transformation”….

 

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